Why do Children Cry?

December 02, 2017 12:34 PM

New mothers often panic when their babies cry, as they do not understand why they are crying. At a very young age, crying is the only way babies can express themselves. Therefore, it will be helpful for you to be able to differentiate between the types of crying.

Here are a few different types of crying and how you can tell them apart:

 

  1. The Hungry Cry:

When your baby is hungry, he will cry while opening his mouth, looking for food. Usually a hungry cry is identified by a high-pitched tone and finger sucking. Once the baby is fed, he will stop crying.

 

  1. The Burping Cry:

If your baby cries after drinking milk, you will know he needs to be burped soon after, due to gas. You can burp your baby by gently patting his back.

 

  1. The Stomachache Cry:

Newborn babies are susceptible to stomachache up to the age of three months. Once the baby feels discomfort and pain in the stomach, he will start kicking and screaming in a highly agitated manner.

A few tips to alleviate the pain: you can wrap your baby in a piece of cloth and rub his stomach with warm oil. If you are breastfeeding, avoid eating food that will give you gas, such as cauliflower, cabbage and spicy food.

 

  1. The Sleepy Cry:

When a baby starts feeling sleepy, he will cry because he wants his mother’s attention. He wants her to sing a lullaby or play some soothing babies’ music. When he is sleepy, he will yawn a lot, while rubbing his eyes.

 

  1. The Discomfort Cry:

Babies will also cry whenever they feel uncomfortable for any reason, which may be because they are in an unfamiliar place, or they feel hot, or they need their diapers changed. If a mother is aware of these situations, she can comfort her baby.

 

A mother should pay attention to the different types of noises her baby makes when he cries. Each need will produce a corresponding sound, and they can be differentiated according to the signals the baby gives that accompany the crying.

 

References:

www.parents.com

www.webmd.com